Cesar Chavez:

Born to a Mexican-American family, Cesar Chavez is often recognized as the most notable Latino and Labor Rights Activists in America. As a migrant worker in California, Chavez and his family experienced first hand the poor conditions endured by primarly Latino farm workers and as any hero would, decided he would do something about it. He went on to co-found the National Farmer Workers Association (now known as United Farm Worker's Union). He is an icon for Latino empowerment and grassroots organizations.

 

Emelia Earhart:

Through her heroism, Emelia Earhart demonstrated to a generation of women that the sky is the limit when pursuing their dreams. As an aviation pioneer, Earhart became the first female aviator to fly solo across the Atlantic ocean. As she is one of the founders of the International Organization of Women Pilots (also known as The 99s), her legacy of women's empowerment continues to inspire us more than 70 years after her trans-Atlantic flight.

 

Fannie Lou Hamer:

Fannie Lou Hamer was an American voting and civil rights activist during the 1950s and 60s. As one of the few female faces of the fight for civil rights in Amerca, Hamer was instrumental in the organizing of integral parts of the movement – playing an important part in the formation of Mississippi's Freedom Summer as well as the Student Non-Violent Coordinating Committee. In 1993, she was posthumously inducted into the National Women's Hall of Fame in recognition of her positive contribution to society at such a critical point in American history.

 

John F. Kennedy:

John F. Kennedy, the 35th president of the United States, is one of our most famous national heroes. He served as the United State's first Catholic president during the height of the Civil Rights movement and and the escalation of the Cold War. Despite the growing civil unrest at home and tensions rising abroad, JFK brought the dream of the United States Peace Corps to fruition, creating a space where American citizens can be “everyday heroes” through volunteerism and intercultural exchange.

 

Marcus Garvey:

Marcus Garvey was the revolutionary leader of Pan-Africanism, a moved that pushed for stronger bonds, politically and socially, between people of African descent. Dogged in his promotion of a stronger connection of Black people to their ancestral homelands in Africa, Garvey even founded the Black Star Line, a passenger cruise liner which carried people of the African diaspora hoping to find their roots by moving back to the continent. Today he is a symbol of Black power, solidarity, and empowerment.

 

Robert F. Kennedy:

Kid brother to late President Jack Kennedy, Robert Kennedy is an American hero in his own right. Having served the country as both Attorney General and later as representative in the Senate, the younger Kennedy is most known for his heroic support of a more liberal and equal society through a platform that unquestionably supported racial and economic justice.

 

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Do you have a suggestion for someone from history that you believe is a hero? If so please write that persons name below and why you think they ought to be considered a HERO IN HISTORY.